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businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news. >> russia's orphans pay the price for a dispute between russia and americans. the gang rape that sparked outrage in india as the victims conditions deteriorate, the politicians look to restore order and offer support. how just 15 cigarettes in a lifetime can lead to cancer. welcome to "bbc world news." coming up, a little girl abducted by her father and taken to pakistan three years ago is now heading back to britain. also, the era of the third age on the silver screen. >> hello, thanks for being with us. russian president putin has signed a bill which bans americans from adopting russian children. the controversial move is said to be part of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said h
russian children has sparked outrage in russia. it is seen as a response to an american bill which targets russian officials accused of human-rights violations. >> they were there at dawn at the duma, russia's federal parliament, taking a stand against the wall that would ban americans adopting russian children. detentions' quickly followed. the authorities were and little mood for tolerance. last week, a washington passed an act targeting russian rights abuses. the list of officials facing travel bans and asset freezes. in the duma, russian legislators promised retaliation in kind. critics accused them of using children as political weapons. >> any child has the right to be treated with care and with love by any person, irrespective of their nationality. >> according to brussels' official agency, there are 130,000 children eligible for adoption, yet last year fewer than 11,000 found families. 956 went to the u.s.. over the past 20 years, as many as 60,000 russian orphans found homes in america. but isolated cases of abuse by adoptive parents in the u.s. have caused public outcries in russ
to cover so let's get right to it. russia dominating our newscast this hour. for two very different reasons. first, the man, that man you see there, russia's top diplomat, he is now taking an active role in trying to end the civil war in syria. now, remember, both russia and china have blocked u.n. attempts to force out the assad regime. now the russians say they are willing to meet with the syrian opposition. it could open the door for real u.n. action on the ground, action that could mean american involvement. we've got more details in a live report in just a minute. >>> but also, russia's president formally saying no to americans who want to adopt russian children. it is a heartbreaking development for hundreds of americans who are trying to adopt children from russian orphana orphanages. that is happening right now. president vladimir putin signed the adoption ban today. sadly, more than 50 americans who were in the final stages of adopting russian children, they are not going to be able to. and while those families certainly hoping that they're going to allow these adoptions to go thro
for peace talks as the violence escalates. the country's ally, russia, is inviting the leader of syria's opposition to visit moskow for the first time but that offer turned down. some interesting developments here. let's get them from leland vittert live in our mideast bureau. leland? >> reporter: jon, no one really views russia as an honest broker here especially the rebels who for so long seen russia side with pat assad in this conflict. they don't really want to deal with the russians, hence turning down the invitation. the rebels now think time is on their side. the momentum is on the battlefield has shifted. for so long the rebels were outgunned and outmaneuvered. they hold major parts of northern part of the syria and major population centers in the center of the country that president assad up till now had control. one rebel fighter said we'll fight all the way to president assad's palace. the rebels don't see a reason to negotiate while president assad is in power. the while the offer from the russians may not be so significant is the fact they're making it is significant. russ
what is going to happen next. >> russia has invited the officers of the syrian national coalition for parks, and is urging president bashar al-assad to do the same. they say russia must first condemn the president before dialogue him take place. russia says the transitional government should be put in place, with bashar al-assad staying in power. >> we have already had dialogue in cairo. we expressed readiness to meet with them, and are still ready. as we understand, they do not have any objection regarding the offer to leave. we are against interference from outside parties in syria. we understand we need a ceasefire. we agreed the geneva convention contains the elements to move forward for political settlement. >> in the caesarian title, schilling has devastated large parts of the city, including a large suburbs. the rebels say they have also made gains in eastern syria. fighters say they have captured this oil field. tens of thousands of mainly sunni iraqis turned out to protest the government. they are accusing maliki of marginalizing sunni leaders. >> a sea of people gatherin
now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe the situation in syria? >> well, you know i think he went on saying that the syrian government seems to be losing ground in the fighting with the opposition and i think this is obvious. but i don't think there is anything in that statement which one can welcome or not welcome. first of all, that doesn't mean that the trouble will end any time soon. the fighting may continue for a very long time still and the battle may keep going this way or the other way for a long time because you will recall when the crisis started the predictions were that it will last for two to four months and president assad is going to be toppled but that did not happen. another important thing to remember is that even if the current stage of the crisis were to end in the so-called victory of the oppositi
" tonight, we interview russia's ambassador to the united nations, vitaly churkin about syria and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. while i may carry the genes of an irish pub crawler, my chances of becoming an alcoholic are slightly less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major fundi
the arrests, an allegation he denies. russia's foreign minister says he will welcome any country's offer for a safe haven for al assad. he also says syria is using chemical weapons to keep them safe from rebels. united states has warned syria against using the weapons. the army has shelled several districts in the capital. an armed group says it is preparing to impose a no-fly zone over the city. >> we have intelligence proving the regime is using commercial flights to transport troops and military gear to murder unarmed civilian people. we issued this warning to all civilians to refrain from using commercial planes to avoid being used as human shields. any plane in the sky will be targeted by anti-aircraft missiles. we have imposed a no-fly zone in this province. this will come into effect within three days. >> let's hear from our correspondent who has an update on the turkish-syrian border. >> an ultimatum was issued. we saw the video on the internet. they told the local population you have to do your duty to take out assad's forces. you have to open the door to rebels or we will launc
>> syrian government forces bombarded the city. there's no russia-u.s.-backed peace plan on the table. this is al jazeera, live from our headquarters in doha. an assassination that shocked the world. five years after the death of benazir bhutto, are we any closer to knowing who killed her? president obama cutting short his holiday to take up the financial fight in washington. plus -- >> in central kenya, this is one of the last remaining northern white rhinos in the world. new technology could help protect it. >> welcome to the program. i wish there was a plan, words from the man trying to broker a peace deal in syria. international envoy lakhdar brahimi made the comments in the last few hours at the end of a trip to syria. he met with representative poe representatives from both sides. >> some have come here to market a russian-american project. i wish there was a russian- american project. hence, i did not come here to market it. >> the syrian government delegation led by the country's deputy foreign minister has been in russia for talks. he was reportedly sent to mosco
to finally find help for her problems when so many others are still looking. >> russia's president says he'll sign a bill banning u.s. citizens from don'ting children from his country. rights groups say, though, children in russia's crowded orphanage will find less of a chance to find a home. >> so far i see no reason not to sign it although i have to review the final text and weigh everything. in the world there are probably a lot of place where is the quality of life is better than here. but so what? are we going to move the children there? we need to do everything in our own country in order to provide for a worthy future for all of our children. >> a mass rally is being held in madrid over plans to cut 4,500 jobs in the spanish airlines. iberia includes british airways. the country says the restructuring should boost profits over the next years. >> electricity bills are set to sore to pay for the massive cost of alternative power sources. our report from berlin. politicians could make this an issue for the next election. >> low powered lightbulbs and tips about using your appliances wi
by russia and the u.s. may be the only chance to prevent a sectarian war in syria. >> the situation in syria is very bad. very, very bad and the differences are increasingth >> but most syrians remain skeptical of brahimi's initiative. they say assad and those loyal to him should be discarded from any future deal. army troops have intensefied air strikes across the country. here in the eastern province, fighter jets bombed rebel strongholds. the military is stepping up its campaign to stop the rebels from advancing. there was been mass destruction on the eastern out skirts of damascus where the rebels are holding territory despite con tant air strikes. the siege -- besieged towns bear the brunt of the assault to push the rebels out of damascus. these are the victims of the raging violence in homs. activists say dozens of people were killed by the army, which took the area. on syrian tv, trenches dug by the rebelled to protect themselves from shelling the but in the absence of a decisive military victory, the rebels will have to decide whether to negotiate piecemeal or brace for a prolonged w
with its own people never had many allies to begin with. today russia's support of syria is cracking. for the first time a senior russian official has says publicly syria could likely fall to the rebels. the deputy foreign minister in moscow said we need to look at the facts in the eye. we can't exclude a victory by the opposition. the russians have blocked all u.n. security council resolutions aimed at stopping the civil war in syria. they have vetoed sanctions against the assad regime and provided weapons to government troops fighting the rebels. now their most powerful ally says assad might be losing. they're not alone. head of nato today said this. irng the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. i think now it is only a question of time. but those people, they're the politicians, want to see the real side of syria's civil war, the streets where people are caught up in the crossfire dying there. what you're about to say you can only see here on cnn. this is a teenager risking his life to save a stranger. here's arwa damon. >> reporter: a fighter slithering across the street,
comes from the official scene right here beside syrian president assad. this is russia's deputy foreign minster. he told his country's state run news service the syrian government is losing control of more of the country. a quote from him. "we need to look at the facts in the eye. unfortunately we can't exclude a victory by the opposition." russia was one of the votes that kept the united nations from acting against assad. on top of that, today the native secretary general said this. >> i think the regime in damascus is approaching collapse. i think now is only a question of time. >> another possible sign of assad's regime cracking. four scud missiles that officials say were aimed at anti-government faxes in northern syria. scud missiles here. analysts say the regime they are using reckless extremes it's a sign of desperation. we will talk about that at the top of the hour, but today 28 syrians were killed according to opposition groups. nearly all died in two car bombings in the damascus superbs. >>> a warning, your bank account could come under attack from cyber criminals. this coming
relationship with russia. i think it was a vote on my behalf and others to say we would like a better relationship with the russian people and the russian government. this is an opportunity for russia to show that that vote was juft, this is an opportunity to show the international community at large you can be a constructive force at a time of great need and you have the capability to do some good. i find it ironic and red lines are talked about, but the red line here is literally red. the line we're crossing is 40,000 people have died. what bothers me is the most we are all fixated on the method of killing, not the killing itself. for over a year, we have been talking about getting involved and need to stop this before it gets out of hand. we want to shape what happens after assad leaves. it will be hard to go to the syrian people when they achieve their freedom and say we would like to help you and they will say, you did little at a time in our debatest need. we have a chance to correct that impression. from an american national security point of view, if we don't secure these chem
as the sweetest 4-year-old boy you could ever meet. he lives in russia where the moyers visited him a few months ago with the intention of adopting him. >> we know that there are special needs children in that area of the world and that is something that we are open to and the child that we are pursing, vatalia, has down's syndrome. >> reporter: the moyers who live in georgia are facing what could be an insurmountable obstacle. president vladimir putin has indicated he will sign it into law. >> if what they say is going to happen really happens, those families are not going to be able to adopt the kids even if all the legal processes already have been in place. but much more important, let's focus on the children. what it means is those children will remain institutionalized. >> reporter: some see the russian bill as retaliation for an american law that puts restrictions on russians accused of human rights violations. according to statics by the u.s. state department, the number of russian children adopted by american couples has increased significantly in the last few years. in 2004, the number
, with russia and china, containment when it came to russia was countering their expansive capabilities. >> rose: right. >> our own -- when it came to their nuclear capability we were talking about deterrence. >> rose: right. >> and so i think first we want to contain iranian influence in the region, but i think the question that people are -- that what the president is really addressing is, or would we be content with deterrence? >> right. >> and there i think the difference in the ayatollahs and their religious, their they cratic approach to the world, their threats to destroy israel make them a more worrisome, significantly more worrisome possess sorry of nuclear weapons than other nuclear states. >> rose: because they have a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the
. secretary of state hillary clinton said today that the united states and russia to get syrian president al-assad to talk about the political transition and syria. she spoke yesterday with russia's for a minister and the u.n. peace envoy to the next conversation with u.s. ambassador to syria, robert ford on president assad using chemical weapons. investor four was part of an event held by the foundation for defense of democracy is yesterday. this is about half an hour. >> the good morning. very nice to be here. let me thank andy for that very kind introduction and i would also like to thank john for inviting me here to talk to the foundation for the defense of democracy st. john and i go way back to when we were in iraq together. another tough situation where we were trying to help promote space change in the middle east. i am only going to talk for about ten minutes and then i would welcome some questions and a little more of a discussion. so just listening to me drone on. i want to take just one minute and give you my sense of the situation on the ground and syria, which is changing. and
through. a blizzard. we are seeing very cold conditions across many parts of russia down through to the ukraine and poland as well. snow and ice is already on the ground and causing quite a few problems with the driving as well. for many of us in the eastern parts of europe, it will stay very cold but the system over the southeastern parts will be spinning around and also giving heavy showers across parts of libya down through egypt as well. for the western parts of northern africa, mostly fine and subtle. not a great deal of problems with the weather. to the east, some of the showers could turn out rather strong. but whether it can also be making its way further to the east, too. already plenty of heavy downpours -- and more heading through thursday. all of it pushing steadily toward the east. kuwait will likely to see clouds and just a chance of thunderstorms. of the people in these camps have fled violence or poverty elsewhere in the country. the government has no where to put them. and elsewhere across afghanistan, aid groups are trying to distribute emergency supplies to the
the craft about two days to reach the iss. vulcanologists in russia have been able to get a glimpse of a spectacular eruption in siberia. it began erupting in late november. >> huge areas of the surrounding tundra and wildlife have been destroyed by the lava stream. it is pouring out thousands of tons of law every second. the volcano last erupted in the 1970's in one is -- in what is one of the world's most volcanic regions. >> stay with us. you are watching the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. after a short break, we look at how more and more journalists are coming under harms way than ever before. >> welcome back. every so often, we are reminded that journalism can be a dangerous occupation. reporters without borders says 2012 was the deadliest year for journalists since it began collecting statistics in 1995. >> a few days ago, a high- profile reporter from u.s. tv station nbc escaped death when he broke free from his kidnappers in syria, but many journalists have not been so lucky. >> the civil war in syria has made it the world's most dangerous place for journalists.
exchanging views with ambassadors from japan, the u.s., china and russia. she has already started moving to form her government. she'll meet with members of the present administration to go over issues. a transfer commission will finalize her policies. then in february she'll officially become the first woman in south korea to be president. >>> voters in south korea thought about the power of conglomerates when they cast ballots. many are frustrated that the big business blocks are elbowing out small and medium-size companies. they want their next president to level the playing field. we'll take a more in-depth look into that issue on friday. >>> japan's next leader has been dialing up the pressure on central bankers. he says they need to do more to shore up the economy. officials at the bank of japan emerged from two days of meeting and agreed to pump money into the economy for the fifth time this year. policymakers decided to add 10 trillion yen or $120 billion to the bank's asset-buying program. they plan to add $60 billion to buy up long-term government bonds. they will spend another
eight inches of snow piled up overnight. this is triggered by warm air from central russia. people along the west coast can expect plenty of snow and wind again and plenty of low temperatures, but these kids aren't really minding that and having a lot of fun here. let's pull back and show you we do see a low pressure system that is going to be developing and moving across this country, so that will be intensifying the wintry pressure pattern on top of what we have already been seeing. about 5:40 a.m., we have identified 198 centimetres, that's about two metres height in yawata prefecture, and the bad news is it's going to be continuing. about 18 centimetres will be found in the next 24 hours. about 50 centimetres will be piling up as well. in kyoto, about 126 kilometres per hour is expected and the waves will pick up about 6 metres high on the coastal region. then the pacific side will be remaining very dry, so watch out for that very dry air. high pressure will be dominating the crane peninsula and much of that china, and it's going to be very cold. frigid arctic air will be pulling in,
pictures from russia. this is the volcano erupting on a peninsula. it suddenly burst to life, pouring who lava and sending clouds of ash into the air. experts say the eruptions were caused when a 5 kilometer crack appeared, and it is unclear when the a robson might end. that brings the program to -- end.the eruption might that brings the program to a close. from all of us here, thank you for watching, and please tune in. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in, helping to provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise in a wide range of solutions. what can we do for you? hi, neighbor! we're going to pick vegetables from our school garden. and then miss elaina's coming over for dinner. i'm excited to be with you, and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon found
ambitions for the high-speed rail line. it will extend them into russia and southeast asia. the winning numbers have been drawn. this translates as "the fatone." ticket sales were down. initial reports showed 27,000. among the luckiest faces, and this town. more than 1000 tickets one the maximum price. it is common for residents of a village to share in a big win. what happens if you are the only one in your town he misses out on the big one? r series on lottery winners and losers. >> the village is striking it rich. 2011, all 250 one between $130,000 and $3 million. everyone except the only one unlucky enough not to buy a ticket for the big christmas draw. today he works on his farm house finishing the documentary he has been making about the they win. >> these are the lottery winners in spain. this is sheer joy. this is the biggest lottery in the world. >> it made the village and everyone in it a global news story. >> it was funny because everybody would start saying it. and you zero, and they were frozen. >> this is a sleepy place. it is a model village in the 1960's. not much has ch
of countries like brazil, russia, india, china doing a little better, accelerating. at the same time as europe is in recession. but if the worst for the happen in the u.s. and were to resolve this issue, did you be looking at a much weaker global growth, somewhere around 2% perhaps. that would be something that people would feel around the globe. a >> the united nations is officially ending its peacekeeping mission in east timor. they've played a key role in helping the bloody fight for independence from indonesia. >> the united nations has been with east timor at every step of the ways in organizing the vote for independence from indonesia and 1999. the and ran the fledgling nation for three years and send in peacekeepers to quell fighting between rival factions of the armed forces in 2006 when its current mission began. the dozens of people were killed and tens of thousands forced to flee their homes. as violence threatened to engulf east timor as it did during the push for independence. two years later, a failed attempt to assassinate the president exposed a fragile country to even more ins
in the hundreds aside from the u.s. and russia. and they would have to be included which is a complication. >> i want to take you to the question of strategy and strategy formulation. there are those who say that the united states has lost its ability to think and to act strategically if you look at for example our involvement in iraq, there are those who say that was strategically unwise and became something that was negative to the united states' broad interests. if you look at where we are now closing in on a fiscal cliff or fiscal crises of our own making that could then become obviously problematic for america's borrowing capabilities and economic health more broadly. have we combated strategic thinking. if so why and what do we have to do to become better at strategic thinking. >> attention to the inbox is killing us because it takes away our opportunity to think in long-term -- and to do long- term thinking. and to think strategically. there's no part of the government that really does strategic thinking well now. i mean the state department has a policy planning organization. they don't
had received a bundle of letters from schoolchildren in russia. and it reminded me that there was an incident in russia years ago where a gunman went into a schoolhouse and wantonly killed children and the monsignor was so touched by it, but that's the way this event has touched the world. i will tell you that this is a strong town, and you can feel the people of this community pulling together to support the survivors and thinking about how they can rebuild the town and its spirit. the first selectwoman said so pointedly the other night at the interfaith service that we will not allow this event to define newtown, connecticut, and they will not. but the families of those who have been lost have been changed forever. and it's in that regard that i particularly want to thank my colleagues for this resolution of condolence and support. i want to thank my colleague, senator reid, for the moment of silence yesterday in this chamber. in my faith tradition, when you visit a house of mourning, one of the customs is for the visitor to sitilently with the mourners. d it's ve
, england -- went back home for a bit, back to russia, impossible to ground the man at a time when the money that goes along with those kinds of states that's put to immediate use. we knew that 20 # million are affected by the floods, and we know that transparency international, 70% of the world bank money given for dam maintenance was siphoned off. it doesn't take anyone, really, to guess where that money went. you know, this is a president who was called mr. 10% in the first time, mr. 50% in the wife's second term, and now during his term, mr. 110%, and that's, you know, the corruption is not according to me or pakistani sources, but it's according to john burns of the new "new york times" that places the corruption at $2 billion to $3 billion. >> so you don't approve? >> i wouldn't vote for him, no. [laughter] >> this, of course, has been the struggle and the tragedy of pakistan over a long period of time that when something like democratic elections occur, the sighfullian leaderships that take office fail the mandate that brought them there, and they often fail in space that's pinched an
, and it -- russia. 70% of the world's energy is here. and energy becomes so dramatically contagious, what do you do, briefly on human rights, i do believe actually the big difference between the democracy and dictatorship is simply this, a soft asset but very important one that india doesn't record human-rights that we will necessarily be proud of but -- i believe that china may be a successful nation that cannot be a modern nation and the only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, the quality and presents and until then if it is successful -- >> let me say three things. i want to follow on the admiral's comments about democracy, it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the united states has not ratified the convention. we had a pretty sincere effort to bring it forward to the senate. we were a couple votes short. i think senator mikulski for her encouragement. i hope we will be able to take that up again and get it done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we are making which is these potential conflicts over territory from reed bank and
. >> syria is suspected of possessing the world's third largest after the u.s. and russia. seron gas can be put in arstilliery shells whampt if is the risk for the u.s. should those weapons be used. >> again, when we start making these large blanket statementings of weapons. in secret our intelligence agency knows what bunkers they are in and how many they are and know and the syrians know we know . we do face an issue down stream at some point which is not that the syrians use the weapon. how do we get them before the terrorist get them. that one is going to be tough to figure out . because the only logical thing is to send teams on the ground to secure them and that's a, you really have to think carefully how you do that. >> really quickly sir, to your point of other terrorist geth their hands on the weapons. if assad flees for example. that is the big worry. militant groups that are on the ground there and rebels gleting their hands on the weapons . the impact of that. can you speak to that for a moment. >> that's the big worry and i think that is why the administration really too slo
policies. >> on the outside there. >> what about china's book, continental border with russia? what about china buying to siberia. i'm colonizing siberia, sending out some of these people -- how to separate the united states? how does that worry the united states? actually, china getting stronger unaccounted siberia? >> i haven't heard any proposals for china to buy parts of siberia. [laughter] their border issues, but i haven't heard any proposals. investment -- well, the united states very much once a prosperous china, but we also want a prosperous china that assumes greater responsibilities and engagement throughout the world commensurate with the capabilities and economic power. we don't want china simply to grow and take a free ride or get a free ride on everything else that's happening around the world, that china needs to set the intake are responsible when managing international affairs, with its conflicts in africa to the middle east, to north korea and elsewhere. so we are seeing some of that already. there is good cooperation on many issues, including afghanistan, engagement wi
to end the fighting in syria. her meeting with russia's foreign minister came as rebels intensified the fighting around the capital of damascus. now, speaking for the first time about the meeting, secretary clinton laid out her vision of a syria without president assad. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unifyied, democratic syria in which all citizens are represented; sunni, alawite, christians, kurds, jews, men, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future. and a future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. heather: secretary clinton also called the meeting a beginning and warning that there's still a lot of hard work ahead. jon? jon: the world is waiting for assad's next move. if intelligence reports are correct, he already has ordered his military to prepare chemical weapons. those, we can only presume, would be used against his own people. recent rebel victories seem to give him more incentive to use such weapons, so what can we expect if he does? how do we react, and
. >>> also new this morning, russia's parliament approved a controversial measure that will ban american families from adopting russian children. according to russian media reports. that goes to president putin to be signed into law this is seen as retaliation for a new u.s. law that imposes travel and economic restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>> it was a black christmas? initial holiday numbers not very good. a report from master card said holiday sales growth slowed by more than half this year, and the weakest holiday shopping season since 2008. the report said shoppers were not in a subpoenai inspending m of the fiscal cliff threat and hurricane sandy. >>> box office gold for les miserables. it blew away all expectations. raking in $18 million on opening day. strong number one. and number two, jangle on chains, starring jamie fox and leonardo decap icaprio. and then the hob bot, parental guidance and jack reacher. >>> in the next half hour, we'll preview some of the top picks with christopher john farley of speak easy. "the wall street journal's" culture website. we'll
is apparently moving its chemical weapons. now, of course is a red line for nato and the u.s. and even russia is concerned about this, saying if you use chemical weapons, then the international community will have to respond. already 40,000 dead in syria. >> in iran, they have apparently captured another of our drones. >> they claim they brought down a scan eekle on the ground the zone. it's a small surveillance drone generally used to watch their own ships not an armed drone. if iran brought it down, the u.s. will see that as an aggressive action. last month they tried to shoot one down in the same place. ayear ago iran claimed to have brought down a more technical drone. >> cenk: that is three different instances of at least firing or capturing one of our drones. the last time the americans said no absolutely not, one of our drones just happened to get lost. later, they said yeah, ok, that was our drone. by the way we want it back from iran. we're just flying an illegal drone over your air space would you give i did back to us. iran said no. take a look at this map. look at our bases and fl
in russia where three members of a feminist, a group have been found guilty of who will listen for staging a peaceful protest against vladimir putin in son of an orthodox church. -- inside of an orthodox church. >> when i put on my mask, i feel like i can do everything. of course, i and the same person, but this is another part of me, which has more courage, which has a strong pillar of what she is doing is right. she has enough power to change something. >> republicans are mounting increasing pressure on desert covers member taught taken to end his speed to unseat glenn mccaskill. >> legitimate rape, the female body has ways to shut that whole thing down. let's assume that did that work or something. i think there should be some punishment, but the punishment should be on the rapist, not attacking the child. >> rape is rape. the idea that we should be parsing and qualifying and slicing what types of rape we are talking about does not make sense to the american people, and certainly does not make sense to me. >> your thoughts on the run-ryan ticket? >> no comment. >> we are trying to follo
generally throughout central asia. sadly in russia we haven't -- we have seen a return to not quite the old-style days but bad and the senate adopted the magnificent act 92-4 which is a great statement. [applause] >> i said to one of my colleagues there are days you'll be shocked by this in recent times when i left the senate wondering if i had done anything that would matter during that day. as part of a large majority, we have done something -- this is history, victory over communism and the soviet union, somehow the respite from conflict with short, there are lessons to be learned. both of these were ideological conflicts at heart. these people missed that and the conflict we're in with islamist extremists, it is a theology whether it is an ideology. the other hopeful thing to say is ultimately, as generally happens, communism collapsed at the weight of its own repression and evil and i am confident what is true of islam as extremists and terrorism but the other lessons that you have to be clearer in making the ideological counterargument which we did for a long time against the communis
at an example in the 1980's, boris yeltsin, the president of russia, the norwegians had a zero weather rocket that they launched in the direction of russia. then notify the russians, but this time the notification got lost in the mail. the russian generals came and said, look, apparently somebody has lost something in us across our horizon. this is an american nuclear attack you have to miss the launch or russia will be obliterated with no shots back. thankfully was sober that date. relations were good between the u.s. and the soviet union. he said to me you know, it can't be the americans attacking. when you talk about the u.s. and iran, is drolen iran, flight times, the attention, the chances of something going wrong , the escalation ending in disaster, that much higher. finally, you also have to be concerned about iran with a nuclear umbrella. oh, well, being more responsive. actually, history argues otherwise. if you look at pakistan, they became much more aggressive after they got. they started attacking in india knowing that the indians wanted to avoid getting into a nuclear exchange. i
in russia. it faces another vote before it can be signed into law. russia is one of the top sources for international adoptions over a 12-year period, more than 45,000 u.s. adoptions came from russia. >>> and on this first day of winter, a powerful winter storm and one of the busiest travel days of the year. it's adding up to be a big headache for those trying to get out of town for the holiday. this storm that hammered the midwest, it's now on the move and cnn meteorologist's alexandra steele, how bad could it get? >> it's been rough and it's getting rough tonight. here's what is happening with the delays, predominantly in new york, laguardia, jfk. boston as well. laguardia to newark to boston. san francisco has had four-hour delays. now 3 1/2 hours and it is weather-related there, too. ft. lauderdale is having a volume issue. this is the exiting storm, this rain that is leaving. skies are drying out but temperatures will drop precipitously. this is where the travel will really get tough. rochester, buffalo, six to 12 inches of knsnow coming for the. washington, baltimore, clears o
peacefully or a bad let's talk about iran. let's talk about russia and let's talk about egypt which one is the king pin in this whole mess? >> rush sharks -- russia, period for syria anyway. base where they have ships coming into. they vin influence over both countries as we know the russians have been helping the iranians. egypt not so much. egypt has its own problems. iranians we are already in their face so to speak. sanctions. issues with elm this. russia is the king pin here. they can do the most good and the most harm. frankly, now if the represents are used they will hold partial responsibility since they supplied them to president assad and obviously they would be a coconspirator using bad act. >> we have to be concerned quick answer "yes" or "no" about assad sending those weapons of mass destruction over to iran, right? >> the biggest thing we have to worry about is him losing control of those weapons. terrorists or iran. terrorists worried about. but no matter what, we have got to maintain positivelike on where those things are at. >> lt. colonel tony shaffer, thank you, sir.
. >>> more than 50 american families were in the final stages of adopting a child from russia. now they don't know what will happen after the controversial law that bans adoptions by americans. now, we are talking to
yesterday." the president of russia vladimir putin put new distance today between his government and the regime in syria. in his annual news conference, putin insisted his country is not protecting syrian president bashar assad. he urged assad to hold talks with the opposition, and negotiate an end to the bloodshed. >> ( translated ): we are not concerned about the fate of assad's regime. we understand what is going on there and that his family has been in power for 40 years. the changes are undoubtedly needed. we are worried about a different thing-- what next? we simply don't want the current opposition, having become the authorities, to start fighting the people who are the current authorities and become the opposition and we don't want this to go on forever. >> sreenivasan: on another matter, putin indicated he plans to sign a law banning u.s. adoptions of russian children. that move is retaliation for a new u.s. law aimed at punishing russian human rights violators. in u.s. economic news, growth during the summer quarter was better than first estimated. the commerce departme
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